Shou-Sugi-Ban® https://shousugiban.co.uk Charred Timber Cladding Tue, 08 Dec 2020 10:28:21 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 5 Benefits of Charred Timber Cladding https://shousugiban.co.uk/5-benefits-of-charred-timber-cladding/ Tue, 08 Dec 2020 10:28:21 +0000 https://shousugiban.co.uk/?p=1140 5 Benefits of Charred Timber Cladding For the past century, brick and concrete construction have been the primary building materials. Before this, wooden beams and timber cladding were far more commonplace across Europe and Asia. A growing awareness of sustainability and the natural environment is causing change. An increasing number of architects and building developers […]

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5 Benefits of Charred Timber Cladding

For the past century, brick and concrete construction have been the primary building materials. Before this, wooden beams and timber cladding were far more commonplace across Europe and Asia.

A growing awareness of sustainability and the natural environment is causing change. An increasing number of architects and building developers looking back to this tradition of using timber as a construction material. This was clearly illustrated in the high number of timber-clad buildings that were winning entries in the 2020 Homebuilding and Renovation Awards.

Yakisugi; the Tradition of Charring Timber

Across Europe, oils, varnishes and other protective finishes are typically applied to exterior timbers. These help to preserve the wood and increase resilience against the elements. In Japan, a different means of protection was developed centuries ago; Yakisugi.

Yakisugi, the tradition of charring timber was developed as a wood preservation technique. The Japanese discovered that by creating a deep, controlled burn on the surface of Japanese Cedar panels, they could increase its durability. What’s more, the Japanese burnt timber cladding proved resistant to fire and burrowing insects.

Whilst developed as a practical solution, charred timber cladding has a striking dark finish which is now taking centre stage in contemporary design.

Exterior Solutions Ltd has a dedicated team who have learnt the art of Yakisugi. Using a range of controlled techniques, we have created the Shou Sugi Ban® range. With a variety of colours and finishes, we have become a renowned charred timber cladding supplier. Our timbers are used on prestigious development and renovation projects across the UK.

Here we identify the 5 benefits of charring timber cladding.

Weatherproof Charred Timber Cladding

Timber is organic, naturally strong and durable, but also hygroscopic. This means it expands and contracts in response to changing moisture levels. If exposed to the changing seasons of Europe or Japan, it cracks, warps and rots.

Applying oils, varnishes, paints and other protective coatings creates an outer barrier. This helps to protect the timber. There are highly effective products on the market, but these need to be reapplied regularly to maintain weatherproofing.

In Japan, they char the timber. The controlled burning of the wood draws out natural resins and leaves a layer of carbon on the surface. As it is part of the timber, not an additional coating, this weatherproofing system is long-lasting.

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Charred Timber Repels Insects

Deterioration can also be caused by biological sources including insects, mould and fungi.

We have all seen examples of wooden beams with holes created by wood burrowing beetles (woodworm) or rotting wooden window frames. Coatings can be applied to reduce the risk of infestations. These are not needed on charred timber cladding, as the carbon outer layer is a deterrent to insects.

As for mould and fungi, they need very specific moisture and oxygen levels to grow. Techniques such as kiln drying timber, applying protective coatings or charring minimise the risk that these conditions will occur.

Charring Enhances the Fire Resistance of Timber Cladding

It goes against expectations, but the process of charring timber increases its resilience to burning. The controlled process removes the soft outer cells, which are quick to ignite. The tough, lignin cells, are revealed and these require a considerably higher temperature to ignite.

This means charred timber has different thermodynamic conductivity to untreated timber. With just concerns about the fire resistance of timber cladding, we offer an additional fire retardant treatment if required.

Added Strength

Another surprising benefit is that charring timber adds to its strength. It seems strange that removing an outer layer strengthens the wood, but the process draws out moisture. This results in a stronger end product.

The Aesthetic Appeal of Charred Timber Cladding

Finally, the finished effect of charred timber is highly desirable and can make quite an impact! Variety is achieved by using different tried and tested timbers and varying the brushing and finishing process.

Our Shou Sugi Ban® range includes burnt larch and Douglas Fir. When charred, these create a strong definition between the wood and grain. For a contemporary twist, we can infill the grain with any RAL colour to create a bespoke finish. This technique has been popular for bold exterior and interior design.

For a traditional look, cedar timbers can be charred and either left with a crackled charred finish, lightly brushed to create a smooth finish or heavily brushed to define the grain.

Yakisugi in Summary

With its roots in history, charred timber cladding offers an appealing building material for contemporary buildings.

If you would like to find out, please contact Exterior Solutions, charred timber cladding suppliers, on 01494 711800. Used in both interior and exterior application, we can answer your questions about this practical, sustainably-sourced, renewable and stunning construction material.

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Using Charred Timbers in Biophilic Design https://shousugiban.co.uk/using-charred-timbers-in-biophilic-design/ Tue, 08 Dec 2020 10:16:40 +0000 https://shousugiban.co.uk/?p=1125 Using Charred Timbers in Biophilic Design So many of us have enjoyed more time in the garden, local parks and natural countryside in 2020. With few other options, the great outdoors has provided an escape from the confines of all living under one roof. Whether enjoying games and a picnic through summer, or a walk […]

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Using Charred Timbers in Biophilic Design

So many of us have enjoyed more time in the garden, local parks and natural countryside in 2020. With few other options, the great outdoors has provided an escape from the confines of all living under one roof.

Whether enjoying games and a picnic through summer, or a walk on a glorious autumnal day, many of us have started to feel the benefits of reconnecting with nature. Once outside, we appreciate the changing seasons, the stunning landscapes and the colourful blooms in the garden.

What if our homes, offices and public spaces enabled us to reconnect with nature even whilst indoors? With the use of natural materials including charred timber cladding, is it possible to create buildings that enhance well-being?

It is, and this style is known as biophilic design. This article explores the concept and explains how this relates to charred timber cladding and other natural materials.

What is Biophilic Design?

Biophilic design focuses on how the built environment can be improved by nature. This is not a new concept; an example is a hotel room designed by Oliver Heath back in 2015, which included Shou Sugi Ban® charred timber. Oliver Heath has championed this design concept. At last year’s London Design Festival it was recognised as being a strong influence in architecture and interior design for 2020 and beyond.

Why are Natural Materials Important in Design?

There is a connection between natural elements and how positive and productive we feel. Research shows a correlation between our exposure to nature and our sense of well-being. We can’t always be outdoors, but biophilic design surrounds us with natural references.

Biophilic designers optimise natural light with large south-facing windows and roof lanterns. Windows are positioned where they offer the best views and less desirable perspectives can be improved with exterior planting, including window boxes. With these design considerations, our affinity with nature is satisfied and we feel all the better for it.

Connecting with the Natural Environment

On the exterior, the defined grain or crackled finish of charred timber cladding offers natural patterns, textures and character to a building. Our Shou Sugi Ban® charred timbers offer a desirable, timeless finish which helps contemporary buildings blend into the natural environment. The Suffolk Black Barn, designed by Studio Bark is a prime example.

Internally, biophilic design uses stone, wood, woven willow, leather, cork, silk and cotton rather than synthetic materials. These materials bring the outside in. Their colour palette and tactile nature deliver a sense of calm. The deep tone of external wood cladding might be reflected with a dining table made from burnt timbers or dark kitchen cupboard doors.

Oliver-Heath

Planting and Colour

Plants are a primary feature of biophilic design, but this is more than a token Kentia Palm or Cactus on the windowsill. Plants can be used effectively to divide internal spaces and aid social distancing in public areas and offices. A connection can be made between internal and external planting, creating a sense of flow between internal and external spaces. From pot plants to living green walls, no home or office is complete without greenery.

Colour and pattern play a role in biophilic design. This year, Farrow & Ball released a collection of paints developed in collaboration with the Natural History Museum. Matched with natural specimens, the range includes Duck Green and Common Marigold. For Dulux, Tranquil dawn, a muted tone was their colour of 2020. What will the 2021 colours of choice be?

When it comes to soft furnishing and wallpapers, botanical prints are popular. These cover everything from stylised designs inspired by the Arts & Craft movement, to tropical foliage and simplified Skandi patterns.

Charred Timber Cladding Suppliers

If you are drawn to the feel-good factor of incorporating nature in your new house build, renovation project or property upgrade, check out the Shou Sugi Ban® range online.

Exterior Solutions Ltd is a trusted charred timber cladding suppliers. The Shou Sugi Ban® range includes a variety of woods and finishes, which are widely used in both heritage and contemporary architectural and interior design. Based on the traditional Japanese technique of Yakisugi, our experienced team create quality finished timbers in our on-site workshop.

The charring process is effective in creating a highly desirable range of colours. We offer a tried and tested timber selection includes burnt larch, burnt fir and burnt oak cladding. More than providing a strong visual impact, the process also helps to protect and preserve the wood. This reducing maintenance and makes the wood suitable for long-term external use.

If you would like to receive Shou Sugi Ban® samples, call us on 01494 711800. We can also answer your questions and discuss the suitability of charred wood for your application.

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Hello world! https://shousugiban.co.uk/hello-world/ Tue, 29 Nov 2016 10:44:43 +0000 https://shousugiban.co.uk/?p=1 Tweets by mike_happykite This is content from a WYSIWYG Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!

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